So…along one of the many roads that lead to these posts, there was information about a new poetry walk (a recurring topic) in Newton, Massachusetts. (We posted about another poetry project in Newton five years ago and were glad to see they’re still at it.) The new project has the excellent name Make Poetry Concrete. (Read more here and here.)

Thinking there might be a better photograph than the one from the City of Cambridge, we searched the term Make Poetry Concrete and were happily misdirected to a Concrete Poem Generator. (Poetry generators are another recurring topic.) Thus you have the silly poem-ish pumpkin-shaped image above. So Happy Halloween!

poetry walk

July 20, 2018

Every poem is written one letter at a time, but in Utrecht, a UNESCO City of Literature in the Netherlands, the process is being taken more literally than usual. At the rate of one letter and one tile per week, The Letters of Utrecht (not to be confused with the Brisbane, Australia, music project of the same name) is revealing itself in a poem-without-end. In fact, according to Atlas Obscura, the city- and subscriber-supported project is “being written by a changing roster of Utrecht’s Guild of Poets (so far there have been seven), the words known only to the next writer’s imagination.”

For more, visit this audio tour of Utrecht, including a brief audio introduction to the Letters.

It has been more than two years since we mentioned the Sunshine Coast Hinterland Poetry Trail in Queensland, Australia. Happily, the Pente Poets have been hard at work in the meantime and the trail “was launched in fine style in December 2017,” according to poet Judith Bandidt. The trail winds through “hinterland, urban centres and coastline,” with poems carved in sandstone, wood, and metal marking the route.

Congratulations to the Pente Poets for completing this ambitious project.

Read more about the trail, the poets, the poems (including audio), and the process, on the Pente Poets website and on Facebook.

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image: Maleny Trail poem by Lyn Browne, excerpted from “Black cockatoos”

another poetry walk

December 12, 2017

We haven’t added a locale to our poetry walk collection for a while, so here’s a new one: Nanaimo, BC, Canada. The Vancouver Island city is embedding a poem in the sidewalk outside the Port Theatre to honor each outgoing poet laureate. The first panel, which was installed in March 2017, is a poem by Nanaimo’s inaugural poet laureate Naomi Beth Wakan. Nanaimo’s current poet laureate, Tina Biello, serves until 2020, when another panel will be added to the Nanaimo Poetry Walk.

(Thanks to Michael Dylan Welch for the heads-up on this news.)

. . . . .
photo

a poetry walk surprise

January 13, 2017

Christopher Luna poem

Here are the bare facts: Christopher Luna is the first poet laureate for Clark County, Washington. Poet, publisher, visual artist, writing coach, teacher, and editor, he is the co-founder of Printed Matter Vancouver, the Ghost Town Poetry Open Mic, and Poetry Moves, a program that places poems by local students and adults on buses in the C-Tran system serving the county. (Among other achievements.)

The Vine is Clark County, Washington’s bus rapid transit system.

Yesterday, Christopher Luna posted (on Facebook) the following true story:

Today my dear friend and employer, Leah Jackson, took me on a “field trip.” She would not tell me where we were going or why. We hopped on the Vine, C-Tran’s newly launched BRT, and took pictures of the art that has been installed at all the Vine stops. At first I thought that this was what she wanted to show me, since she was on the committee that handled the art for the new bus line. I was not prepared for the real reason for our trip. When I saw that C-Tran had decided to include my name and one of my poems at the Vancouver Mall Transit Center, I was astounded. I was completely speechless, which anyone who knows me can tell you is rare. One of the things that makes this surprise honor so special is that the poem that was chosen describes a very momentous conversation I had with my son, Angelo Luna. Thank you to everyone in the community who has supported me and my activities over the years. There are no words to describe my gratitude.

Nice!

more poetry walking

August 18, 2016

Connemara, Ireland

As long as we’re on the subject of poetry walks, here’s another. This one comes courtesy of Washington State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall, who recently returned from Ireland and mused on his rambles, including a visit to the Letterfrack Poetry Trail in Galway. Officially launched in 2014, the trail connects the village of Letterfrack with nearby Connemara* National Park and the Connemara West Centre. Nine poets were commissoned to write poems for the trail and an additional poem — in a “secret” location — was contributed by Ireland’s president, Michael D. Higgins. The poetry plaques along the trail were made with locally sourced larch and slate.

You can learn more about the Letterfrack Poetry Trail on the Conamara* Environmental Education and Cultural Centre website and read about Tod Marshall’s Irish sojourn on the Washington Poet Laureate site.

*variable spellings reflect those in the source material

poetry walking

August 17, 2016

Soliman poem NPS

In our ongoing pursuit of all-things-poetry-walk comes this ambitious project by poet/performance artist Moheb Soliman. Soliman’s project, H.O.M.E.S. (Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie, Superior), explores “the place of nature in modernity, identity, and belonging.” He has tracked, on land, the entire coastline of the Great Lakes and has formed partnerships with local stakeholders in the region. One outcome of his meandering is a series of “nature poems masquerading as official park signs” on trails at Pictured Rocks, Apostle Islands, and Indiana Dunes National Lakeshores, and Isle Royale National Park.

You can learn more about the artist, his art, poetry, residencies and the HOMES project on Moheb Soliman’s website. There’s more about the Great Lakes installation on the National Parks Service site and still more in a brief story in The Detroit News.

. . . . .
NPS photo

Crane - Far strum

The other day, on the occasion of Hart Crane’s birthday, we posted a quote by the poet. It bears mentioning that Cleveland, Ohio, can also be added to our rather extensive collection of poetry walks (see the list in the sidebar, at right), where Hart Crane is remembered with a large-scale sculpture by Gene Kangas.

The artist used words from Crane’s poem “The Bridge: The Tunnel” in his 1992 creation. You can read more about the sculpture and see lots of photos in a 2006 article by Norm Roulet and read more about Hart Crane’s life, tribulations and connections to Cleveland in a 2012 article by Anne Trubek in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Skagit poetry walk

May 9, 2016

Skagit photo by Scott Terrell

Without much fanfare, the Mount Vernon, Washington, City Library has installed 30 poems along three Skagit trails: the Trumpeter Trail, near Mount Vernon High School, and the Viewpoint and Nature Trails on Little Mountain. The words of local poets, including students and three former Washington poets laureate, are represented in Poetry in Nature. See more in the Skagit Valley Herald and walk the trails while the poems are on display, during the month of May.
. . . . .
Trumpeter Trail photo by Scott Terrell for Skagit Valley Herald

another poetry walk

March 31, 2016

Mill Road Cemetery, Cambridge

We’ve mentioned the artist Gordon Young before. His large-scale public art projects often incorporate words or poetry. Here’s another.

Bird Stones is an installation at Mill Road Cemetery in Cambridge, England. Each of the seven pieces is engraved with a poem about a bird that frequents the cemetery and a description of the bird’s call. The standing stone sculptures are also designed to serve as perch, shelter and water source. “House Sparrow,” above, includes a bible inscription and a poem by Andrew Motion.

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