awards

February 23, 2018

Since 1963, the PEN Awards have honored the most outstanding voices in literature across a diverse range of genres, including fiction, poetry, science writing, essays, sports writing, biography, children’s literature, and drama. With the help of partners, PEN America confers over 20 distinct awards, fellowships, grants, and prizes each year, awarding nearly $315,000 to writers and translators.

This week, PEN named the 2018 PEN America Literary Awards winners as well as the 2018 PEN America Lifetime and Career Achievement Honorees. Among the former is poet Layli Long Soldier’s debut collection, Whereas. Among the latter is poet Kamau Braithwaite for his body of work including Elegguas, Born to Slow Horses, and Ancestors.

Congratulations to these two important voices in poetry.

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countdown

February 22, 2018

It’s almost time…
The annual submission window for the Sue C. Boynton Poetry Contest will open a week from today, Thursday, March 1, 2018, and remain open until 6:00pm, Saturday, March 31, 2018.

Early and late submissions will be disqualified.

This would be an excellent time to review the submission guidelines and make sure your poem does not exceed the line count or character count.

Whatcom County poets, on your mark…

comic relief

February 21, 2018

In case you’re in need of some comic relief, Tom Gauld may be able to help. His comics, which often refer to literature or the writing life, may be familiar from The New Yorker, The Guardian, or New Scientist, but you can also find them on Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Laugh a little. It’s good for you.

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AltLib new home for poetry

February 20, 2018

Bellingham’s Alternative Library has moved around a few times, but it seems to have found a solid home base in an historic church near downtown and the Western campus at 519 E Maple Street. In addition to a robust lending library, it is a community space, hosting near-daily events, including concerts, film screenings, workshops, and readings.

And speaking of readings, check out the Radical Poets’ Showcase: Featuring ATL Slam on Friday, February 23, 2018, at 8:00pm. (Suggested $7 donation.)

Featured poets:

Nobody Likes Us But We’re Here Anyways
Nate Mask and Ryan J are Atlanta-based spoken word artists. They are tolerated in their local scene because their poems are somewhat entertaining, but nobody actually likes either of them. Their work touches on topics ranging from the struggle of deconstructing masculinity, learning to exist in a world that looks down on blackness, relationships, mental health, to driving in Atlanta traffic. Despite their differences in approach and personality, their dynamic as a team somehow works, as Ryan actually enjoys talking to people, and Nate always comes through in the clutch, and opens tough jars for Ryan.

Robert Lashley
A 2016 Jack Straw Fellow, Artist Trust Fellow, and nominee for a Stranger Genius Award, Robert Lashley has had poems published in Feminete, Seattle Review Of Books, NAILED, GRAMMA, and The Cascadia Review. His first full-length book, The Homeboy Songs, was published by Small Doggies press in 2014. His new book, Up South, was published in March 2017.

Dee Dee Chapman
Dee Dee Chapman received her BA in Creative Writing at Western Washington University in 2016. She has been published in The Noisy Water Review, Sweet Tree Review, and Wallpaper Magazine. In September 2014 she self-published her first chapbook, Colluvium, whose title poem received a 2017 Walk Award from the Sue C. Boynton Poetry Contest. She’s the Editor of Nine Lives Later: a Dead Cat Anthology, released in November 2017.

on poetry

February 19, 2018

“These days, poetry is often thought of as a mode of self-expression; the subject for a lot of poets is their own self-absorption. Poems are thought of as acts of individualism. What we have forgotten, however, is that the roots of poetry are deeply social. The earliest poems were songs of ritual that celebrated the resources of the world around us; the earliest poems were also a means of recording tribal histories.”
Rick Barot
(b. February 19, 1969)

. . . . .
Quote from “Tribute to Lawson Inada”

O, pen

February 18, 2018

Now and then we like to update you on poetry submission deadlines for Cascadia-based publications.
NOTE 1: This list does not include contests.
NOTE 2: This is not a list of all the literary publications in the region, only those with open or nearly-open submissions. To see more, see the NW lit scene links in the sidebar at right.
NOTE 3: Read the publication and read the guidelines before submitting. Please.

Here’s the latest:

new voice in Spokane

February 16, 2018

Poetry has a new voice in Spokane: Power 2 The Poetry. Power 2 The Poetry is a movement promoting freedom of expression, providing a platform to the under-represented in the community, including people of color, LGBTQ+, women, millennials, etc. Founded by Bethany Montgomery, AJ McKinney and Lynn’Marie White, Power 2 The Poetry seeks to raise awareness of social, cultural, and political issues, encouraging poets to address topics that make people uncomfortable.

“We initiate in-depth discussions engaging our audience in meaningful dialogue to inspire change. We express, expose, ignite.”

See the article in The Inlander, visit the Power 2 The Poetry website, like them on Facebook, and hear the Power at one of their upcoming events (February 20 at the Spokane Public Library, February 28 at Auntie’s Bookstore).

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