festival season

September 10, 2020

The 2020 Tell It Slant Poetry Festival (formerly the Amherst Poetry Festival) is a free event that celebrates the poetic legacy of Emily Dickinson and the contemporary creativity of the Pioneer Valley (Massachusetts) and beyond. This year’s festival will be held remotely, and will take place September 14-20, 2020.

The schedule is out now and includes headliners Ada Limón, Jericho Brown, Kimaya Diggs, Franny Choi, Shayla Lawson, and as is tradition, the Emily Dickinson Marathon.

Space is limited, so make sure to sign up for individual programs in advance.

new podcast

July 7, 2020

We recently wrote about voca, the University of Arizona Poetry Center’s Audio Video Library of more than 1,000 recordings of poets reading their work during visits to the Center between 1963 and today. The Poetry Center has now curated selections from voca for a brand-new podcast series, Poetry Centered.

In each episode, a guest poet introduces three poems from voca, sharing their insights about the remarkable performances recorded in our archive. Each episode concludes with the guest poet reading a poem of their own. Our inaugural season includes episodes hosted by Hanif Abdurraqib, Alison Hawthorne Deming, Ada Limón, Urayoán Noel, Maggie Smith, and TC Tolbert.

Visit the Poetry Centered Podcast page to listen, subscribe, or download transcripts.

Congratulations to the 175 writers, scholars, artists, and scientists who have been named winners of 2020 Guggenheim fellowships. The impressive list includes the following poets:

  • Michael Dickman, Poet, Princeton, New Jersey; Lecturer in Creative Writing, Princeton University
  • Janice N. Harrington, Poet, Champaign, Illinois; Professor of English, University of Illinois
  • Ada Limón, Poet, Lexington, Kentucky
  • Philip Metres, Poet, University Heights, Ohio; Professor of English, John Carroll University
  • Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Poet, Oxford, Mississippi; Professor of English, University of Mississippi
  • Lisa Olstein, Poet, Austin, Texas; Professor, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin
  • Jana Prikryl, Poet, Brooklyn, New York
  • Diane Seuss, Poet, Kalamazoo, Michigan
  • Brian Teare, Poet, Charlottesville, Virginia; Associate Professor of Creative Writing, University of Virginia

“Guggenheim Fellowships are grants to selected individuals made for a minimum of six months and a maximum of twelve months. Since the purpose of the Guggenheim Fellowship program is to help provide Fellows with blocks of time in which they can work with as much creative freedom as possible, grants are made freely. No special conditions attach to them, and Fellows may spend their grant funds in any manner they deem necessary to their work.”

award season

January 24, 2019

The National Book Critics Circle has announced its 31 finalists in six categories — autobiography, biography, criticism, fiction, nonfiction, and poetry — for the outstanding books of 2018. The finalists in poetry are:

  • Terrance Hayes, American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin (Penguin Books)
  • Ada Limón, The Carrying (Milkweed)
  • Erika Meitner, Holy Moly Carry Me (BOA Editions)
  • Diane Seuss, Still Life with Two Dead Peacocks and a Girl (Graywolf Press)
  • Adam Zagajewski, Asymmetry. Translated by Clare Cavanagh (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Terrance Hayes was also listed as a finalist in the Criticism category, for To Float in the Space Between: A Life and Work in Conversation with the Life and Work of Etheridge Knight (Wave).

The National Book Critics Circle Awards, begun in 1974 and considered among the most prestigious in American letters, are the sole prizes bestowed by a jury of working critics and book-review editors. The awards will be presented on March 14, 2019 at a free public event held at the New School in New York City. See the complete list of finalists in all categories here.

are you listening?

October 23, 2018

Every couple of months, editors from Poets & Writers Magazine offer a behind-the-scenes preview of the latest issue, talk with contributors and authors featured in the magazine, and discuss the lighter side of writing, publishing, and the literary arts in a podcast called AMPERSAND. The latest edition, Episode 22, features “superstar nonfiction writer Susan Orlean, best-selling novelists Barbara Kingsolver and Richard Powers, and Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Natasha Trethewey.” In Episode 21, Kevin Larimer and Melissa Faliveno discuss the work of Ada Limón and Rebecca Solnit. Find other episodes on Soundcloud. Listen!

National Book Award in Poetry

November 18, 2015

finalists in poetry

The winners of the National Book Awards in Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People’s Literature will be announced this evening, November 18, 2015, at the Benefit Dinner and Ceremony at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City. The ceremony will stream live on the National Book Foundation website.

This year’s finalists in poetry are:
Ross Gay, Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, published by the University of Pittsburgh Press.
Terrance Hayes, How to Be Drawn, published by Penguin.
Robin Coste Lewis, Voyage of the Sable Venus, published by Alfred A. Knopf.
Ada Limón, Bright Dead Things, published by Milkweed Editions.
Patrick Phillips, Elegy for a Broken Machine, published by Alfred A. Knopf.

You can see the long-list and finalists in all categories on the National Book Award page and read Elizabeth Lund’s article on the finalists in poetry in the Washington Post.

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