get heard!

March 5, 2021

In celebration of National Poetry Month (April), The New York Society Library invites you to record yourself reading a poem of your own or one by someone else. Add it to the collection anytime until end-of-day Friday, April 9, 2021, and NYSL will include it in 30 Days of Poetry 2021.

poetry in your ears

November 30, 2020

If recent publications are any indication, poetry readers are also eager to listen. Several poets have issued audio versions of their latest books at the same time as the books themselves. For example,
Margaret Atwood, Dearly
Jericho Brown, The Tradition
Barbara Kingsolver, How to Fly (In Ten Thousand Easy Lessons)
Aimee Nezhukumatathil, World of Wonders

In addition, here are some other places to find audio poetry:

Happy listening!

Dream Loaf

August 8, 2020

From Wednesday, August 12, to Saturday, August 22, 2020, Middlebury Bread Loaf Writers’ Conferences will offer Dream Loaf, a free, curated selection of readings and lectures from their archives along with live events. You can see the general schedule on the Dream Loaf page. The archived material will go live on the day of the event and can be accessed simply by clicking on the program title.

On the same page, you can find lectures from the Bread Loaf Environmental Writers’ Conference and the Bread Loaf Translators’ Conference, available now, free.

listen!

May 9, 2020

voca, the University of Arizona Poetry Center’s Audio Video Library, features recordings from the Center’s long-running Reading Series and other readings presented under the auspices of the Center. The earliest of these recordings is a Robert Creeley reading from 1963. Some recordings are accompanied by photos from the Center’s archives. It’s free. Listen.

listen!

April 2, 2020

The archives of The Bagley Wright Lecture Series on Poetry (BWLS) contain full-length lectures, brief audio and video clips, transcriptions of Q&A sessions, and selected writings by featured poets. They are available for your enjoyment without charge.

are you listening?

October 23, 2018

Every couple of months, editors from Poets & Writers Magazine offer a behind-the-scenes preview of the latest issue, talk with contributors and authors featured in the magazine, and discuss the lighter side of writing, publishing, and the literary arts in a podcast called AMPERSAND. The latest edition, Episode 22, features “superstar nonfiction writer Susan Orlean, best-selling novelists Barbara Kingsolver and Richard Powers, and Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Natasha Trethewey.” In Episode 21, Kevin Larimer and Melissa Faliveno discuss the work of Ada Limón and Rebecca Solnit. Find other episodes on Soundcloud. Listen!

are you listening?

July 10, 2017

A note from the keyboard: when you’ve put up 2490 posts on the subject of poetry over the course of seven years, it’s surprising to happen upon poetry news that has somehow entirely missed the radar. One such, now happily discovered, is Commonplace. Commonplace features conversations between Rachel Zucker and other poets, exploring advice, lists, anecdotes, politics, phobias, spirituality, and more.

Launched in June 2016 with an interview with David Trinidad, the collection now numbers 32 — the latest last week’s conversation with Laynie Browne. The recorded sessions vary in length, from about an hour to more than two, and make fine listening for all your podcast needs. You can also find Commonplace on Facebook.

the joy of listening

July 18, 2016

ear budsWe occasionally mention the pleasures of listening to recorded poetry (for example, here and here and here). If you question the benefit of listening, or need a reminder of the particular benefit of hearing authors read their own work, take a quick look at Wyatt Mason’s New York Times article, “Letter of Recommendation: Audiobooks Read by the Author.

If you’re looking for audio, here are a few resources (in addition to those in the posts linked above):

. . . . .
image by Berthold Werner

listen up

July 5, 2016

The Archive Project

If you enjoy listening to the conversation of intelligent people, check out The Archive Project. A collection of talks from the Portland Arts & Lectures series, The Archive Project offers more than 250 original lectures for free listening and downloading as well as weekly broadcasts from the archive on Portland’s OPB Radio. A tremendous aural resource, including many poets.

Listen

August 3, 2015

Badilisha Poetry ExchangeAs vast as the continent is, there has never before been a single online collection of Africa’s poetic voices. The Badilisha Poetry X-Change is correcting that omission, gathering the words and voices of, to date, more than 350 African poets from 24 countries. A radio-style audio archive, BPX provides an introduction and bio for each poet along with text and audio files of one or more of the poet’s work. Two new poets are featured each week.

Providing wider exposure for African poets benefits the poets themselves as well as local, regional and international audiences. The user-friendly, searchable Badilisha Poetry X-Change website explains, “of all the published books in the world, the works of African authors comprise only two percent.” With a growing collection (BPX accepts submissions), the website and podcasts, a Facebook page and an upcoming roadtrip, Badilisha Poetry X-Change hopes to bring wider attention to seldom-heard voices that contribute to the rich tapestry of poetry worldwide.

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