LiTFUSE

April 26, 2021

The LiTFUSE folks have just announced the full faculty lineup for this year’s LiTFUSE gathering. Though they are not yet certain whether the September 24-26, 2021, events will be virtual, face-to-face in Tieton, Washington, or somewhere in between, pre-registration is now open, as are signups for the two master classes, which typically fill up very quickly. You can also view video highlights from last year’s virtual LiTFUSE.

We’ve mentioned the Western Washington University Children’s Literature Conference before. Now in its 18th year and typically attracting more than 600 participants, the Conference has assumed a new shape for 2021 to contend with travel and gathering restrictions.

It begins with a free, month-long virtual exhibit of work by the writers and illustrators of children’s literature. With a theme of Art as Protest / Art in the Time of COVID, the collection is varied and rich, offering a look into the creative range of the 20-plus exhibitors. It will remain on view through Sunday, February 28, 2021.

The exhibit also invites written and visual responses from the community. These will be displayed online. To submit work (or a link to existing work), complete the Community Exhibit Submission form.

On Saturday, February 27, the CLC will offer morning and afternoon conversations around themes and ideas that emerge from the Virtual Exhibit. There will be no formal presentations. Everyone is welcome; registration is free but required.

Poetry of Revolt

January 13, 2021

The 23rd Annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Human Rights Conference presented by the Whatcom Human Rights Task Force will include a variety of events, workshops, and presentations, including Poetry of Revolt.

This free online gathering of diverse poets from Cascadia and beyond will celebrate poetry as a form of resistance, revolt, and healing. Performers include Rena Priest, Romeo Romero, Danny Canham, PoetryNMotion, and others. Poetry of Revolt will livestream on Facebook tomorrow, Thursday, January 14, 2021, 5:30pm.

Listen to Margaret Bikman’s interview with Rena Priest about the Poetry of Revolt today, January 13, at Noon, 4:00pm, and 9:00pm, on KMRE 102.3FM or find the podcast on the KMRE Arts & Entertainment Spotlight.

conference season

September 17, 2020

With festival season moved online, it’s little wonder that conference season follows suit. While you may not be within hugging distance of fellow attendees, the schedule of events is still robust and a virtual conference offers plenty to hear, see, and do.

Here’s a link to Write on the Sound, normally held in Edmonds, Washington, this year held online, Thursday, October 1, through Sunday, October 4, 2020.

LiTFUSE 2020, virtually

June 24, 2020

The wonderful late-September gathering of poets in Tieton, Washington, LiTFUSE, has announced that the show will go on, as a fully virtual program.

  • LiTFUSE 2020 will take place September 25-27. Workshops and related programming will be offered in the weeks leading up to the main event.
  • Registration fees will be reduced to $150 per person and include virtual access to all regular workshop classes. Master classes will be available for an additional fee.
  • The poetry slam and keynote events will take place virtually. In place of the poet’s banquet, there will be a digital cocktail reception for faculty and registered attendees.
  • Special accommodations for the digital environment, such as closed-captioning, printable media, etc., can be arranged.

The 2020 LiTFUSE Faculty is now listed on the site and Registration is open.

be an early bird

February 25, 2020

Chuckanut Writers Conference

The tenth annual Chuckanut Writers Conference will be held at Whatcom Community College (plus a few outlier events) on Friday and Saturday, June 26 and 27, 2020. The 2020 conference faculty is now posted online, master classes (June 25) are listed, and registration is open, with early-bird rates through May 25.

&Now

July 27, 2019

&NOW is a bi-annual festival of fiction, poetry, and staged play readings; literary rituals, performance pieces (digital, sound, and otherwise), electronic and multimedia projects; and inter-genre literary work of all kinds, including criti-fictional presentations and creatively critical papers. This year’s theme, Points of Convergence, invites speculation into the ways the arts might forge convergences at a moment of social, cultural, and political schism.

Keynote presenters include LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs, Barbara Browning, and Nathaniel Mackey.

The conference will be held at the University of Washington, Bothell. Registration is required and is now open. Early-bird pricing will continue through September 1, 2019, when prices double. One-day passes for each conference day are also available.

calendar page

May 30, 2019

Just a reminder that the CALENDAR page is loaded with poetry events and updated almost daily. It covers the Cascadia region and extends 12 months into the future.

We’ve added sections for events that happen Every Week and Every Month, and we’ve also added poetry/writing conferences and the dates that submissions open for publications that are based in the region.

To make a correction or add your event to the calendar, send an email to thepoetrydepartment at gmail dot com with the following information (required): date, city, brief description, time, venue, valid link for more information.

Click on CALENDAR, near the top of this page. Add your event. Visit often.

call for papers

May 14, 2019

Here’s an intriguing opportunity… the Society of Architectural Historians is now accepting abstracts for its 73rd Annual International Conference, to be held in Seattle, April 29 – May 3, 2020. There will be 33 thematic sessions, including Architecture and Poetry, with the following session description:

From the birth of literacy in the fourth millennium BC to the contemporary moment, and across the globe, buildings have stimulated poetic responses, often read aloud at dedication ceremonies or other ritualized events.

While ekphrasis in particular has been studied extensively over the last two decades, and there are many case studies of poetry about buildings occasioned by specific events, this session aims at a more general understanding of the potential relationship between architecture and poetry across time and geographies. We invite contributions on poetry that treat the practice of architecture in general, or real or fictional buildings in particular. We seek to understand how descriptive and allusive poetry attempts to match the construct of verse to the construction of architecture, whether that be imagery or syntax. We are interested in poetry that theorizes architecture, to gauge how buildings express practices or ideas, whether or not they align with their builders’ intentions, and the difference between poetry and prose as languages of the imagination.

The most famous examples in the western tradition are the ekphraseis of epic, from Homer until the eighteenth century. However, we are also interested in poems that are not confined to codified ritual, or the products of a courtly or institutional ambience, poems in which other voices appropriate buildings in perhaps satirical or ironic ways to allow them to speak with a different timbre. Finally, we are interested in how such phenomena take shape in (specially commissioned) poems on buildings, whether in stone, metal, glass, or neon; how concrete poetry functions as an intermedium; and not only the written text but also performative poetry such as spoken word. Contributions may come from any epoch and any region of the globe.

Session Co-Chairs: Fabio Barry, Stanford University, and Maarten Delbeke, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology

If this sounds like a challenge you’re prepared to meet, abstracts are due Wednesday, June 5, 2019, at 11:59 p.m. See the guidelines and learn more about the conference here.

Corroding the Now: Poetry + Science + SF is a gathering of scholars, poets, critics, scientists, science fiction writers, students, and many others. The event will take place on April 12-13, 2019 in Egham, Surrey (United Kingdom), and is set to be the first major academic event dedicated to exploring the relationship(s) between poetry, science, and science fiction.

If your scholarly concerns fall into that realm, consider responding to the Call for Papers. “We are interested in academic papers and panels, creative responses, poetry readings and performances. We welcome scholars, poets, critics, scientists, science fiction writers, students, and all others.”

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