(re)new(ed) interview series

October 22, 2018

The Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center has relaunched its poetry interview series with Anastasia Nikolis as interviewer. Previous interviewees in the series include Aracelis Girmay, Paisley Rekdal, Terrance Hayes, and Karen An-hwei Lee, among others. The first interview in the relaunched series features Joan Naviyuk Kane.

You can find links to each of the interviews on the LOC Interview Series page and you can read an editorial by Anastasia Nikolis explaining her intent for the renewed poetry series.

(You may also note that the Library of Congress has a new logo, above. Read about the Pentagram design.)

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are you listening?

July 10, 2017

A note from the keyboard: when you’ve put up 2490 posts on the subject of poetry over the course of seven years, it’s surprising to happen upon poetry news that has somehow entirely missed the radar. One such, now happily discovered, is Commonplace. Commonplace features conversations between Rachel Zucker and other poets, exploring advice, lists, anecdotes, politics, phobias, spirituality, and more.

Launched in June 2016 with an interview with David Trinidad, the collection now numbers 32 — the latest last week’s conversation with Laynie Browne. The recorded sessions vary in length, from about an hour to more than two, and make fine listening for all your podcast needs. You can also find Commonplace on Facebook.

In case you missed the December broadcast on PBS, you can watch/listen/read Jeffrey Brown’s interview with Graywolf Press executive editor Jeff Shotts in which they discuss the press’s 99 percent rejection rate and the difference between publication and poetry. Find it on PBS Newshour.

Claudia Rankine

May 16, 2017

In the Winter 2016 issue of The Paris Review, David L. Ulin interviews Claudia Rankine on many subjects, including her influences, her relationship with the audience and her prize-winning book, Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf Press, 2014). The interview is now online.

what do editors want?

March 23, 2016

Six QuestionsIt’s a question that writer/editor Jim Harrington has been asking for a long time. And while knowing an editor’s preferences, style and idiosyncrasies is no guarantee that your poems will be accepted, it surely can’t hurt.

Harrington interviews editors of literary journals and, every Friday, posts their replies on Six Questions For…. The list of journals is impressive, running far down the right sidebar of the page. Harrington himself writes flash fiction and that genre is well represented.

Of course, the best way to understand an editor’s preferences is to 1) read the publication and 2) read and follow the guidelines. But Jim Harrington’s interviews (and similar interviews on Duotrope, a subscription-based service for writers) provide valuable insights that might just give you the edge you need.

poets’ words

January 7, 2016

divedapper
Divedapper is a site “devoted exclusively to featuring interviews with major voices in contemporary poetry.” The interviews, by poet Kaveh Akbar, are wide-ranging conversations that include a variety of links, which expand upon the topics discussed and the poet interviewed. Have a look.

Listen!

December 23, 2013

Paul MuldoonHere’s some good news: the New Yorker, long a repository of printed poems, has initiated a podcast series, New Yorker Poetry Podcasts. In each podcast, poetry editor Paul Muldoon will interview a poet, who will read from his/her own work as well as that of another poet.

Listen to Muldoon’s 20-minute conversation with Philip Levine, or download New Yorker Poetry Podcast at iTunes.

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