tonight! Seattle!

November 3, 2018

Come hear a rollicking collection of voices at a MoonPath Press reading curated by Risa Denenberg, tonight, Saturday, November 3, 2018, at 7:00pm, at Open Books in Seattle. The stellar lineup features MoonPath poets Ronda Piszk Broatch, Glenna Cook, Alice Derry, Lorraine Ferra, Christopher J. Jarmick, Carol Levin, Rena Priest, Raul Sanchez, and Connie K Walle. See the poets’ bios here, then join them in person.

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Congratulations!

August 14, 2018

It’s pretty exciting when there are names you know on lists of winners, and that’s the news today as Bellingham’s own Rena Priest is named an American Book Award winner for her book Patriarchy Blues (MoonPath Press). Congratulations to Rena and all of The 2018 American Book Award Winners!

book launch

July 13, 2018

Celebrate the art of poetry and the poets who make it happen on Friday, July 20, 2018, as Village Books hosts a book launch and reading.

Award-winning poet Jed Myers will read from his new book, Between Dream and Flesh, a handmade limited-edition publication from Egress Studio Press. He will be joined by poet and fiction writer Lana Ayers (founder, publisher, and managing editor of MoonPath Press) who will read from her illustrated handmade book, The Moon’s Answer (Egress Studio Press), as well as other poems. James Bertolino will read selections from a variety of his poetry publications.

Revising revisited

July 8, 2017

This is a guest post by Richard Widerkehr.

I enjoyed reading Bethany Reid’s blog that mentioned Dylan Thomas’s 67 revisions of “Fern Hill,” a poem I’ve loved for a long time. I remember hearing a story told by the poet Erin Belieu, who said that her husband, a writer, looked through her drafts of a poem and said, “I think you had it at the seventh draft, not the twenty-seventh.” It can be hard to tell at the time, and if you can tear yourself away from trying to get it just right, let some time pass, you can sometimes see more clearly what changes need to be made. Also, one change can lead to other ideas, if you let it.

The most helpful thing I heard about revision in the last few years is what Joe Stroud said: If you find yourself grinding away at a poem and can’t get it right, try reworking it in prose, which can give us sensory details we leave out. Since my first drafts are often telegraphic and leave out things the reader needs to know, putting in more can be helpful. If we’ve been to workshops, people will often tell us what can be cut. Sometimes, the hard part is seeing what we left out. We hide the Easter eggs, as Annie Dillard said. She said she asks herself when she thinks she’s done, “What did I leave out?” If it doesn’t go in this poem, it can lead to the next one.

One example of how I did this is how I worked on my long poem, “Her Story of Fire.” Someone told me Alberto Ríos had given an assignment to write one poem and then write the reply or opposite of that poem. What I did was use two speakers with different voices — one was a mentally ill woman, and the other speaker was her brother. One spoke; the other replied, though they often talked past each other. This exercise became the long title poem of my book Her Story of Fire (Egress Studio Press).

I liked Bethany’s suggestions to rewrite a poem in a different form or using different line lengths or stanza patterns. Sometimes I’ve tried that, and I’ve also tried using different pronouns (you, he, she, we) for the narrator. Often I’ve changed the verb tense from past to present if I want more immediacy.

One thing I do in revising that I haven’t heard many other poets do is find a word that sounds like or rhymes with a word that doesn’t work. Yeats changed “a mass of shadows” to “a mess of shadows.” But then I tend to write using sound and rhythm to lead me to what I want to say, so that works for me and helps me discover or uncover the meaning as I go along, which I like to do. When I wrote my novel, Sedimental Journey (Tarragon Books), it started as a short story about a geologist in love with a fictional character. Later, I made plot outlines but didn’t follow them. It took me nine years to finish the book and another fifteen years to find a publisher.

What did I leave out of this short piece? How to persist and keep writing. One thing I’ve done is switch genres when I got frustrated or bored with what I’m doing. My novel started as a fun break from my serious poems, though it changed and became funny-sad as it grew. My new book of poems, In The Presence Of Absence, will come out in September from MoonPath Press, but I don’t know what comes next.

. . . . .
Richard Widerkehr’s new book of poems, In The Presence Of Absence, will come out from MoonPath Press in 2017. He earned his M.A. from Columbia University and won two Hopwood first prizes for poetry at the University of Michigan. He has two collections of poems: The Way Home (Plain View Press) and Her Story of Fire (Egress Studio Press), along with two chapbooks. Tarragon Books published his novel, Sedimental Journey, about a geologist in love with a fictional character. Recent work has appeared in Rattle, Floating Bridge Review, Gravel, Naugatuck River Review, Cirque, Arts & Letters, and Mud Season Review. He has worked as a writing teacher and, later, as a case manager with the mentally ill.

. . . . .
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Nancy Pagh - Once Removed

If you’re anywhere near Bellingham, Washington, tonight, Saturday, February 20, 2016, come down to Village Books at 7:00pm to hear the wonderful poet Nancy Pagh read from her brand new collection, Once Removed (MoonPath Press 2016).

(If, on the other hand, you happen to be on Lummi Island this evening, join Luther Allen, Susanne Paola Antonetta, Bruce Beasley, Thom Davis, Rebecca Mabanglo-Mayor, Rena Priest and Ellie A. Rogers at the Island Library, 7:00pm, as they each read a selection of poems, including their poem from Noisy Water.)

Last minute!

May 14, 2014

May 14If you’re looking for something to do on this beautiful summery spring evening, here are two events that came to light at the last moment:

6:30pm in Redmond
The first of this summer’s FREE monthly poetry walks, led by Redmond poet laureate Michael Dylan Welch, takes place this evening, Wednesday, May 14, starting at 6:30pm at Farrel-McWhirter Farm Park, 19545 Redmond Road in Redmond. Look for the white poetry tent! “We’ll have a writing exercise, have a leisurely walk to find inspiration in nature, and then share what we’ve written (optional). Please join us!” Event info on Facebook and further details on 2014 Redmond Summer Poetry Walks.

8:30pm in Kirkland
Tonight’s special MoonPath Press Reading at Parkplace Books in Kirkland runs 7 to 8:30pm. Featured readers are Joseph Green (from Longview, WA), Terry Persun (from Port Townsend) and spotlight readings from Tacoma’s Tim Sherry and Seattle’s Raul Sanchez plus OPEN MIC. Free! Parkplace Books is located in the Parkplace Mall off 85th Street in Kirkland at 348 Parkplace Center, Kirkland.

poetry reading!

July 2, 2013

Jennifer Bullis - Impossible LessonsWednesday, July 10, 2013, marks the official debut of Impossible Lessons, poems by Jennifer Bullis — and her reading, at 7:00pm at Village Books promises to be richly rewarding.

Of this collection, just released by MoonPath Press, Jeremy Voigt says, “…Her language is both direct and incantatory, circling through the great human paradox of our animal flesh and our spiritual ascensions….” and James Bertolino says, “…Her images are arresting and unforgettable, the phrases lush and impeccably crafted….”

Originally from Reno, Nevada, Jennifer Bullis earned a Ph.D. in American Literature from the University of California, Davis, and taught community-college writing in Bellingham, Washington, for 15 years. Her work has been published in numerous journals and anthologies and she has won an impressive collection of awards, including, most recently, Honorable Mention, Tupelo Press Poetry Project, Spring 2011, and Winner, The Pitch Contest, Poetry Northwest, November 2010. She was a judge for the Sue C. Boynton Poetry Contest in 2008 and blogs at jenniferbullis.wordpress.com.

Please mark your calendar and join Jennifer and her fans on July 10 as she reads from, discusses and signs Impossible Lessons.

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