on poetry

October 13, 2018

“Language excites me. Irrational thought excites me. I spend most of my time listening instead of writing. A shard of language might come: a phrase, a word, an anagram, and I’d just keep it in my pocket, like a little seed, warming in my fist.”
Ocean Vuong
(b. October 14, 1988)

. . . . .
photo by Tom Hines

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Thursday in Seattle

May 16, 2018

Poet and essayist Ocean Vuong is the author of the best-selling poetry collection Night Sky with Exit Wounds (Copper Canyon Press), which is A New York Times Top 10 Book of 2016, WINNER of the T.S. Eliot Prize, WINNER of the Whiting Award, WINNER of the Forward Prize, WINNER of the Thom Gunn Award, finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, and finalist for the Lambda Literary Award. It was also named a Best Book of the Year at The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Guardian, Huffington Post, NPR, Publishers Weekly, Sunday Times, Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, The Telegraph, Irish Times, Library Journal, Buzzfeed, Bustle, Entropy Magazine, and BookThug.

Tomorrow, Thursday, May 17, 2018, Ocean Vuong will give his first public reading from the book in Seattle, starting at 7:00pm at Canvas Event Space. This is a ticketed event, though no one will be turned away.

poetry on film

February 25, 2018

In our ongoing pursuit of poetry on film, we should mention the new independent film, The Kindergarten Teacher. Directed by Sara Colangelo, the film stars Maggie Gyllenhaal and includes the work of a number of poets, including Ocean Vuong and Kaveh Akbar. To learn more about how the poetry found its way into the film, view the Sundance Film Festival video on the Los Angeles Times website.

(According to the Hollywood Reporter, the film rights have just been acquired by Netflix, which will release the movie later this year.)

prize

January 16, 2018

The Poetry Department would like to join the chorus of congratulations for Ocean Vuong, who has been awarded the T.S. Eliot Prize for his debut collection, Night Sky with Exit Wounds (Copper Canyon Press). Read the story in The Guardian.

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