Living Nations, Living Words

November 28, 2020

As you may have heard, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has announced the appointment of U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to a third term, to begin in September 2021. Harjo is only the second laureate to receive this extension since terms for the position were established in 1943.

Among the laureate’s responsibilities is the creation of a signature project. Hayden’s announcement also marks the launch of Harjo’s signature project, “Living Nations, Living Words.” Designed to “introduce the country to the many Native poets who live in these lands….The ‘Living Nations, Living Words’ project features a sampling of work by 47 Native Nations poets through an interactive ArcGIS Story Map and a newly developed Library of Congress audio collection.”

“Each of the 47 Native Nations poets featured in ‘Living Nations, Living Words’ selected an original poem on the theme of place and displacement, and with four touchpoints in mind: visibility, persistence, resistance, and acknowledgment.” Forty-seven may not sound like a lot, but this is an ambitious project. Follow the links above to learn about the poets, hear and read the poems, and read transcripts of the poets reading and discussing their poems. All of the material is now archived in the Library of Congress.

global community poetry

November 14, 2020

Back in 2017, we posted about a project of the Kent State University Wick Poetry Center, a community poem that became a mural, Healing Stanzas. The success of that project inspired others.

The Global Peace Poem was launched in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Kent State University shootings of May 4, 1970, and a related exhibit, Armed with Our Voices. The poem is ongoing.

Earth Stanzas is an interactive online poetry project in honor of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, April 22, 2020. The site offers a number of model poems as prompts as well as texts that can be used to create erasure poems. The project is ongoing.

Poets for Science and the community poem, “Pledge,” is companion to a traveling exhibit curated by Jane Hirshfield exploring the connection between science and poetry. A model poem by Gary Snyder is provided as a prompt. The poem is ongoing.

Vote the Earth is the most recent project, conceived to help inspire voters to put their love for the Earth behind the power of their vote. Each poem is anchored to a map (image above) according to the poet’s home location. The project is ongoing.

Kudos to the Wick Poetry Center and all who have contributed to these worthwhile projects.

Mapping Literary Utah

November 9, 2020

We’ve mentioned various poetry-mapping projects, including Washington Poetry Routes, and here’s another worthwhile addition to the list: Mapping Literary Utah. Created by Paisley Rekdal, Utah’s fifth poet laureate, the archive includes poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction by hundreds of native-born Utahns, current residents, and writers who spent a significant period of their creative life in the state.

Among the writers is Dayna Patterson, who will be teaching a two-hour poetry workshop, “Exploring the Feminine Divine,” this Saturday, November 14, 2020, and will also be one of five featured poets the same evening for SpeakEasy 27: A Spiritual Thread.

poetry mapping

July 22, 2019

We’ve posted before on the subject of poetry maps. A new project, Places of Poetry, “aims to use creative writing to prompt reflection on national and cultural identities in England and Wales, celebrating the diversity, heritage and personalities of place.”

The Places of Poetry map has a distinctive 17th-century look, until you operate the slider at the bottom of the page, which turns it into a zoomable, contemporary Ordnance Survey map.

The site is open for writers to pin their poems (in English and/or Welsh) to places until October 4, 2019. It will then be closed for new poems but will remain available for readers.

There’s already plenty to keep you busy on the map. (It doesn’t look like so much until you start zooming and more and more places pop up.) Enjoy!

go, Claudia!

April 28, 2019

We recently mentioned Washington Poetic Routes, a new poetry mapping project by Washington State Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna. Now we have further reason to salute Claudia: she has been named an Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow, an honor which comes with significant funding for a new project, One River, A Thousand Names. Read all about it in Crosscut.

. . . . .
photo

a new poetry map

April 16, 2019

When she was Seattle Civic Poet, Claudia Castro Luna spearheaded a poetry mapping project called the Seattle Poetry Grid. Now that she is Washington State Poet Laureate, Castro Luna has expanded the project to highlight site-specific poems for the entire state.

Washington Poetic Routes is a digital poetry-mapping project that explores Washington’s rich geographical terrain, both in terms of landscape and in terms of the human relationships that unfold across the State.

Visit the map, click the dots to read the poems, and submit your own!

Click here for more poetry map posts.

putting poetry on the map

December 20, 2018

Poetry is in the landscape. Go see some.

. . . . .
image: A Sky View of Earth From Suomi NPP

Seattle’s poetic voice

October 2, 2017

Back in June, we mentioned the Seattle Poetic Grid, created by Seattle Civic Poet Claudia Castro Luna. Expanding on that story, Castro Luna and two participating poets were interviewed by PBS Newshour, which has posted the 7-minute segment, “Navigating Seattle’s ever-evolving streets through poetry.” Have a look, and then visit the Seattle Poetic Grid to read some of the city’s many voices.

mapping poetry

June 29, 2017

In a continuing commitment to put poetry on the map, Seattle Civic Poet Claudia Castro Luna has created the Seattle Poetry Grid. The clickable map “traces the city in the voices of its citizens, from folks new to expressing themselves in poems to well established and beloved writers.” Currently displaying the work of more than 60 poets, the map will continue to grow as Seattle poets submit their work to Castro Luna.

More poetry maps: Denver; Dublin; Melbourne; Nanaimo; Scotland; Toronto; the world.

poetry map app

October 12, 2016

Poetic Places

Here’s another poetry map app (for iOS and Android). This one was launched in London, England, but hopes to expand worldwide and invites your suggestions. Poetic Places ties together geography, poetry, history, images and sound. If you leave it running in the background, Poetic Places will alert you when you’re nearing a significant site; if you’d rather plan your poetry route, you can search by location.

A collaboration between the British Library and Sarah Cole of TIME/IMAGE, Poetic Places has an informative website as well as a Facebook page and a Twitter feed @poetic_places. The developers are quite transparent about their process, so if you’re considering a similar undertaking, check out Points of Interest.

%d bloggers like this: