Perhaps you, too, have never heard of the Rabbit Heart Poetry Film Festival in Worcester, Massachusetts. But if you have a unique way of exploring poetry on film, take note. As Doublebunny Press explains, “Anyone can make a video of a poet reading a poem, but that’s not what Rabbit Heart is all about. What we’re looking for is what can be done visually with a poem, without showing performance.”

Submissions are now open for the 2017 Rabbit Heart festival. The deadline is July 1, 2017, and the festival is in October. Read the rules. View some Rabbit Heart on YouTube. Submit your film.

And hey, if you win, let us know, okay?

Join Washington State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall, Michael Haeflinger of Tacoma’s LTAB and student poets at a special screening of the documentary film, Louder Than A Bomb.

Copies of selected books of poetry will be available for purchase, as well as light fare and beverages.

Today, Sunday, May 21, 2017 | 5:00pm | Free | Suggested donation $5 | at Bitters Co., 14034 Calhoun Road, Mount Vernon, Washington

poetry on film

May 18, 2017

In our ongoing effort to keep you informed of the intersection between poetry and film, here’s another entry: “Endless Poetry” (“Poesía Sin Fin“).

“Surreal and breathlessly inventive,” this new film by Alejandro Jodorowsky is making its way through the festival and art-film circuit. You can see it free on Saturday, June 3, 2017, 9:00pm, at the Feast Arts Center outdoor movies in Tacoma.

You can also watch a trailer on YouTube, check out the film’s (closed) IndieGoGo campaign, see the 95% rating in Rotten Tomatoes and read Peter Bradshaw’s film of the week review in The Guardian.

Visible Poetry

April 20, 2017

Here at The Poetry Department we try to keep tabs on the intersection of poetry and other media. The Visible Poetry Project sits right at that intersection, pairing filmmakers and poets “to create visual interpretations of original and classic poems.” For National Poetry Month, VPP is posting a new visual poem each day at 9 AM EST. There will also be a screening on Saturday evening, April 22, 2017, at The City Reliquary in Brooklyn, New York.

Find out more about the project and watch the videos at the Visible Poetry Project website.

movie words

February 15, 2017

poetry on film

We like to highlight films that include or feature poetry — a meeting of two powerful creative forces. Taste of Cinema offers “10 Movies About Poetry That Are Worth Your Time,” which includes some films we’ve previously mentioned and some we haven’t. Have a look.

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watching for Neruda

December 14, 2016

Neruda film posterPablo Larraín’s Neruda opens this week in U.S. theaters. Starring Luis Gnecco as Pablo Neruda and Gael García Bernal as Oscar Peluchoneau, the film, according to Variety, “is not a biopic but an invention informed by biography, conjuring a richly detailed investigator [Peluchoneau] with notions of self-grandeur who’s hunting the famed leftist writer-politician in 1948 Chile.”

In an interview in Film Comment, Larraín says, “Neruda’s particular power came from how he was able to describe our country, our society, our people in a way that no historian or journalist has ever done. If you want to understand who we really are, read Neruda. Neruda is in our water. He’s everywhere. That’s why instead of dealing with his poetry we chose to absorb the poetry and see what comes out after. Neruda is what transpires after drinking that Neruda water.” Manohla Dargis talks with the director in The New York Times.

Watch for Neruda, and read some, too.

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more poetry on film

November 23, 2016

DIE GETRÄUMTEN (The Dreamed Ones)

Here’s another film for your watch-for-it list: DIE GETRÄUMTEN (The Dreamed Ones) is a “docudrama” in which two actors in a recording studio read from the dramatic exchange of poems, letters, postcards, telegrams and drafts between poets Ingeborg Bachmann and Paul Celan, who came to know each other in post-war Vienna. Through their reading, the actors’ own lives and stories become layered with those of the poets.

Referring to Bachmann and Celan as “the most important German poets of the second half of the 20th century,” director Ruth Beckermann calls theirs “a great modern love story.” Learn more on the film website or read a review in The Guardian.

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