meanwhile, in Australia

August 14, 2022

It has been a while since we mentioned a poetry walk, and while this one is more of a poetry drive or ramble, it’s definitely worth mentioning. In the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales around Canberra, Australia, and extending right up into the Southern Highlands, Poetry: The Indelible Stencil is an ambitious project that places poetry in the landscape. Made of stencil-cut steel, ten large signs represent the work of local poets. The presentation is inspired by similar stencils used regionally to mark woolgrowers’ names on wool packs.

Poetry: The Indelible Stencil, which crosses the boundaries of eight local government areas, was organized over a period of several years by poet Lizz Murphy in partnership with Southern Tablelands Arts.

If you’re visiting the Canberra area, download the map and go see some poetry.

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photo

on view: 2021 plaques

May 23, 2022

The planter beds in front of the Bellingham Public Library (210 Central Avenue) are decked in their spring finery, thanks to the Birchwood Garden Club. This is a great time to take a short poetry stroll and view the ten Walk Award plaques for the 2021 Sue C. Boynton Poetry Contest. And while you’re there, stop in and see the recently remodeled library! (The 2022 plaques will probably be put in place sometime this summer.)

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top: poem by Ty Colson
bottom: poem by Peyton Eberhardt

poetry (etc.) walk

April 25, 2022

Market to MOHAI is a “safe, engaging pedestrian corridor stretching from Pike Place Market to the Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI)” at South Lake Union. The route, which connects four parks, is marked by 75 sidewalk tiles with themes of cities and urban environments (No. 4, by Colleen J. McElroy, above) and 46 interpretive history blades that highlight a moment in Seattle’s history. Learn more in this week’s article by Gregory Scruggs in The Seattle Times.

at the local library

April 15, 2022

Nice to see POETRY WALK: Sue C. Boynton Poetry Contest, The First Five Years on display in such good company at the Bellingham Public Library for National Poetry Month. Edited by Nancy Canyon and Anita K. Boyle, and designed and illustrated by Nancy Canyon, the 152-page collection includes the full text of all winning poems from 2006 through 2010. Copies are still circulating in the Whatcom County Library system and at Western Washington University.

A second five-year collection was published in 2015 and chapbooks of winning poems have been published annually since then. The 2022 chapbook will be available at the time of the awards ceremony, Thursday, May 19, 2022.

walk with Emily

May 7, 2021

Perhaps next year the Massachusetts Poetry Festival and the Emily Dickinson Poetry Walk will be live and in person once again, but for now, those of us not in Massachusetts can easily join in the annual event. “Called Back”: A Virtual Emily Dickinson Poetry Walk will happen on Saturday, May 15, 2021, at 8:30am Pacific (11:30am Eastern). Registration is required, and free, with donations gratefully accepted.

We have winners!

May 4, 2021

Congratulations and thanks to ALL of the poets who submitted work to this year’s Sue C. Boynton Poetry Contest, and in particular to the poets who have been selected as this year’s winners:

WALK AWARDS: Ty Colson, David P. Drummond, Marie Eaton, Peyton Eberhardt, Jory Mickelson, Maddie Patterson, Timothy Pilgrim, Janette Lyn Rosebrook, Noa Shelsta, J.L. Wright.

MERIT AWARDS: Rylie Anderson, Margaux Barber, Barbara Bloom, Kathleen Byrd, Lynn Geri, Arden Haines, Sophie Hall, Callum LaPlant, David M. Laws, Payton Ling, Phelps S. McIlvaine, Isabella Nelson, Robert Stern, Kami Westhoff, Genevieve Whalen.

The awards ceremony will be held online on Thursday, May 20, 2021, at 7:00pm Pacific. Access information will be provided as soon as it is available.

In addition… the names of the winning poets and poems will be added to the Winners page. The winning poems and their beautiful illustrated placards will be featured on this page, one per week, over the coming months, and linked to the Winners page. And finally, the Walk Award poems will take their places on the Poetry Walk in front of the Bellingham Public Library, where they will remain on view for a full year. (If you haven’t seen the 2020 Poetry Walk poems, be sure to take a look before they go away.)

Meanwhile, please enjoy this wonderful video celebrating the contest and its namesake, Sue C. Boynton.

poetry walk

September 19, 2020

It has been a while since we mentioned the sidewalk poetry of Northfield, Minnesota. In the intervening years, the City of Northfield Arts and Culture Commission has been busy. The program, which started in 2011, is ongoing, and the interactive map is impressive, with more than 260 poems to date. There’s a documentary, and Northfield residents can even petition to have a winning poem impressed on the sidewalk in front of their house.

In July of this year, Northfield adopted a Racial Equity Action Plan and the Sidewalk Poetry program has wasted no time in showing its support. Submissions for the 2021 sidewalk poetry season are now open to Northfield residents of all ages, and all poems must be in Spanish. (Just under nine percent of the population identifies as Hispanic or Latino.) Go Northfield!

meanwhile in Scotland

July 27, 2020

It has been a while since we added a poetry walk to the list, so say hello to the Corbenic Poetry Path.

Located on the grounds of the old Drumour shooting lodge and estate in Trochry, about 30 minutes from Perth, Scotland, the poetry path displays the work of more than two dozen local poets integrated with diverse landscapes and the artwork of stone carver Martin Reilly. Reilly and poet Jon Plunkett came up with the idea for the poetry path, which was built by volunteers and opened in 2015.

The 3.5km path is open and free, should you find yourself in the neighborhood. Until then, you can browse online here and here.

So…along one of the many roads that lead to these posts, there was information about a new poetry walk (a recurring topic) in Newton, Massachusetts. (We posted about another poetry project in Newton five years ago and were glad to see they’re still at it.) The new project has the excellent name Make Poetry Concrete. (Read more here and here.)

Thinking there might be a better photograph than the one from the City of Cambridge, we searched the term Make Poetry Concrete and were happily misdirected to a Concrete Poem Generator. (Poetry generators are another recurring topic.) Thus you have the silly poem-ish pumpkin-shaped image above. So Happy Halloween!

Happy to report that the North Olympic Library System (NOLS) has again partnered with Olympic National Park to offer a sixth season of Poetry Walks: four self-guided walks on trails featuring poetry in the landscape. Poems appear on signs in multiple locations along four trails: the Hall of Mosses Trail, the Madison Falls Trail, the Peabody Creek Trail, and Living Forest Trail. With the exception of the Hall of Mosses Trail, all trails can be accessed without paying fees. The poems will remain on view through May 31, 2019. For more information visit the NOLS Poetry Walks page.

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