Colluvium*

November 19, 2017


2017 Walk Award
By Dee Dee Chapman

Don’t call it a landslide.

Call it a cascade, if you must name it.

The fracture won’t stand there forever.
It spins itself smooth of you.

The detritus’ rich nutrients,
despite frost action and soil creep.

How does that charismatic rhizome
find holes to take hold in, mold its roots ’round?

We’re not supposed to be balloons, but colluviums.
Waste, land-filled, wistful for landscapes.

If only we knew how to fall upon the mountain
instead of pretending we’re sure-footed.

I bet it would feel like flying long enough to believe
we’re more than pebbles that leapt.

I bet it would feel intentional
like blood flow after tourniquet’s release.

. . . . .
Dee Dee Chapman received her BA in Creative Writing at Western Washington University in Spring of 2016. She has been published in From Bellingham With Love, The Noisy Water Review and Jeopardy Magazine. In September 2014 she self-published her first chapbook, Colluvium. Bellingham has been her home for eight years, the longest she’s stayed in one place. She is a cinephile and her favorite animal is the prehistoric Megalodon shark.

. . . . .
*Copyright 2017 by Dee Dee Chapman. Broadside illustrated by Megan Carroll.

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the envelope, please

November 18, 2017

In case you missed it, the National Book Awards were announced this week and Frank Bidart won the award in poetry for Half-light: Collected Poems 1965–2016 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Read and watch at the National Book Awards website.

Letters, volume 1

November 14, 2017

Volume one of the Letters of Sylvia Plath has just been released by HarperCollins Publishers, an undertaking that The Guardian calls “tangled,” “fraught,” and “newsworthy.” This volume covers the period up to Plath’s marriage to Ted Hughes; a second volume is due next autumn.

The 1,424-page collection contains the full, unedited versions of Plath’s early letters (most from before she was 20). If that sounds daunting, Sarah Churchwell’s article in The Guardian may help.

Since You Ghosted*

November 12, 2017


2017 Merit Award
By Darian Karuza

The sun is a mosquito zapper
sizzling on the veranda,
calving Earth’s shadow
over a lawn of dewy comets.
I am the chrysalis duskywing
ascending latticework to its warmth.

I passed your cross
on the shoulder of the parkway
the other day. It sent crushed ice
sliding down my spine. Who
was Caroline? I can barely remember.

Maybe, what we call a phantom
is just someone’s fiery iron
mass now cast
as a cool brown dwarf,
a shade of human heat,
calfprints in memory
foam,
                    gravity wells
of a supergone black hole,
an unthawable head cold.

. . . . .
*Copyright 2017 by Darian Karuza. Broadside illustrated by Mat Hudson.

the poetry of war

November 11, 2017

On Veteran’s Day it seems appropriate to note that the Dean F. Echenberg War Poetry Collection has found a home at The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin. Echenberg’s collection includes over 6,500 volumes: “works by men, women and children of all nationalities, languages and conflicts…from the first appearance of the written word to the present day.” It also includes related anthologies, manuscripts, biographies, bibliographies, links to online resources, critical examinations, reviews, etc. The collection is searchable online by author or conflict.

To learn more, visit The Dean Echenberg War Poetry Collection and blog and see the Harry Ransom Center press release.

on poetry

November 10, 2017


“Cultivate possibility through a willed variety of influences.”
Tod Marshall
(b. November 10, 1967)

. . . . .
quote

on poetry

October 31, 2017

’Tis the witching time of night,
Orbed is the moon and bright,
And the Stars they glisten, glisten,
Seeming with bright eyes to listen.

John Keats
(October 31, 1795 – February 23, 1821)

. . . . .
quote from A Prophecy: To George Keats in America
portrait of John Keats by William Hilton

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