Reasons to go to…

May 9, 2017

If you are interested in concrete and visual poetry, you may want to plan a trip to Miami this winter. November 17, 2017 through April 15, 2018, The Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) will present From the truer world of the other: Typewriter Art from the PAMM Collection. In 2016, PAMM acquired over 400 language-based works from the 70,000+ piece collection of the Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry. The upcoming exhibition explores the experimental visual and poetic typewriter creations of approximately 15 artists, including Carl Andre, Henri Chopin, Dom Sylvester Houédard, d.a. levy, and Françoise Mairey.

See this 2014 Poetry Department post for additional informative links about the Sackner collection.

. . . . .
image: Dom Sylvester Houédard. from the truer world of the other (dsh 720113), 1972. Typewriting on paper, 13 x 8 inches. Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, acquired from The Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry, with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

What are your plans for Earth Day? Saturday’s weather should be mild and cloudy in Buffalo, New York. But actually weather won’t be much of a concern if you decide to attend the Emily Dickinson Community Marathon Reading. From 8:00am to 9:30pm, local celebs, poets and other Emily fans will read all 1789 of Dickinson’s poems. Plus, from 1:00 to 1:30pm, there will be a break in the readings to celebrate Dickinson with song and comedy improvs!

That’s this Saturday, April 22, 2017, at the Westminster Presbyterian Church. It’s free and you do not need to register or contact anyone to participate. Just show up and join in the reading. More details here.

If your travel plans between March 28 and July 30, 2017, include Southern California, you may want to visit the Getty Center to see Concrete Poetry: Words and Sounds in Graphic Space. The exhibit focuses on the visual, verbal, and sonic experiments of the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s, displaying material drawn principally from the Getty Research Institute’s collection.

Admission to the Getty Center and the exhibit, in Research Institute Gallery I, is free and no tickets are required. (Parking is $15.)

. . . . .
image: Open (Abre), Augusto de Campos (b. 1931) and Julio Plaza (1938–2003), 1969.

“The thirteenth annual PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature will focus its lens on today’s fractious relationship between gender and power. Taking place in New York City, May 1-7, 2017, the weeklong Festival will use literature and the arts to address how gender both enables and impairs full participation in politics and society. At a moment of unprecedented threats to freedom and truth, and of emboldened mobilization and resistance, the Festival will connect leading global writers, artists and thinkers with concerned citizens to examine bigotry, misogyny and xenophobia, and to bolster the movement to counter them.”

More at PEN World Voices Festival: Gender and Power
Twitter: @PENworldvoices/#PENFest
Facebook: facebook.com/PENworldvoices
Instagram: @pen_america
Tumblr: penamerican.tumblr.com

Reasons to go to… Chicago

February 23, 2017

American Writers MuseumThe American Writers Museum will open in Chicago on Tuesday, May 16, 2017. The museum’s mission “is to engage the public in celebrating American writers and exploring their influence on our history, our identity, our culture, and our daily lives.”

The museum will have exhibits for adults and children, ongoing programs, classes, a word waterfall and more. The museum’s first online exhibit, Power Of the Word, is an interactive site in which leaders, readers and writers exchange ideas about valuable books.

See more on the American Writers Museum website, Facebook page, on Instagram and Twitter @AmerWriteMuseum.

Swinging seal engraved Emily, Gold and citrine; English or American, ca. 1850. Houghton Library, Harvard University.

On exhibit now through May 28, 2017, at the Morgan Library & Museum is “I’m Nobody! Who are you? The Life and Poetry of Emily Dickinson.” Bringing together nearly one hundred rarely seen items, including manuscripts and letters, I’m Nobody! Who are you? — a title taken from her popular poem — is the most ambitious exhibition on Dickinson to date. It explores a side of her life that is seldom acknowledged: one filled with rich friendships and long-lasting relationships with mentors and editors.

The exhibition closely examines twenty-four poems in various draft states, with corresponding audio stops. In addition to her writings, the show also features an array of visual material, including hand-cut silhouettes, photographs and daguerreotypes, contemporary illustrations, and other items that speak to the rich intellectual and cultural environment in which Dickinson lived and worked.

Accompanying the exhibition is a variety of gallery talks, discussions, tours, a concert (Tuesday, March 21, 2017) — In Poetry and Song: An Evening with Patti Smith and Jesse Paris Smith — a film, workshop, and an audio selection of poems by Emily Dickinson read by contemporary poet Lee Ann Brown. A substantial amount of the exhibit is available online, with images of many of Dickinson’s draft pages, as well as audio and transcribed versions.

See the full details on The Morgan Library & Museum website.

Reasons to go to…New York

September 14, 2016

Pulitzer Centennial Poetry Celebration

While we don’t often fall for hyperbole, the Poetry Society of America can be excused for using “once-in-a-lifetime event” to describe the Pulitzer Centennial Poetry Celebration. The lineup is enough to make any poet swoon: Rae Armantrout, John Ashbery, Peter Balakian, Carl Dennis, Stephen Dunn, Jorie Graham, Yusef Komunyakaa, Sharon Olds, Gregory Pardlo, Philip Schultz, Vijay Seshadri, Natasha Trethewey, and Charles Wright.

The event will be held Thursday, October 27, 2016, at The Great Hall of The Cooper Union in New York City. The poets will read from their own prize-winning collections as well as select poems by past Pulitzer winners. Following the reading, there will be a private dinner at the Hamilton Fish House with Pulitzer Prize-winning poets and publishers. General Admission for the reading is $15, or $10 for students and seniors. Tickets for the Reading & Dinner are $250 and up. All proceeds benefit the Poetry Society of America’s public programming and signature initiative, Poetry in Motion.

%d bloggers like this: