workshop season!

January 16, 2023

Ready to kick-start a new year of poetry writing? Join Kelli Russell Agodon and Susan Rich for a one-day Zoom class: Generating New Work: A Resolution to Write, Saturday, January 28, 2023, 10:00am – 2:00pm. “You will leave the workshop with 5-8 new starts, but more importantly, you will leave with a toolbox of new ways to approach your own work.”

it’s not too late…

January 6, 2023

The end of the first week of January might be just about the right time to make some resolutions. The pressure of holidays and visitors is mostly past and you may even be feeling a little let down from the seasonal excitement. Sounds like a perfect time to kickstart your poetry. Not sure what to resolve? Here’s a list of poetry-related ideas you can start now and explore throughout the year:

  • Read more poetry.
  • Along the same lines, take a page from Ann Morgan’s TED talk and expand your vision by reading a book from every country in the world. (More here.)
  • Set aside a specific time to read a poem each day: when you wake up, over breakfast, during your bus commute, before bed.
  • Listen to poetry: find CDs in the library or browse The Poetry Archive, Poetry Out Loud, Penn Sound, and find many more links to poetry audio recordings on the Library of Congress web guide.
  • For more listening, try poetry podcasts.
  • Write more poetry.
  • Try something entirely different with your poetry: rhyme it (or don’t), write a sonnet or a ghazal or a persona poem or whatever you’re least likely to write normally.
  • Print out one of your poems that’s “finished,” cut it up into individual words and reassemble it into a new poem, getting rid of unnecessary words and replacing those that could be juicier.
  • Ask for feedback.
  • Do something new with your poetry: slam it, submit it, memorize it.
  • Take a poetry workshop or class.
  • Attend more poetry readings in person and/or online.
  • When you’re spending money on poetry, support poets, indie bookstores, and independent publishers.
  • When you’re moved by a poem, write to the poet to say what you most loved about the poem.
  • If you liked a poet’s book, write a short review on Goodreads or Amazon, or on your own blog/website, or submit a longer one to a journal that features reviews.
  • Buy a copy of the poet’s book and give it to a friend. Invite the poet to read at your event.
  • Subscribe to a poetry journal or give a gift subscription to another poet.
  • Start or join a poetry group: reading, writing, critique, whatever.
  • Watch films that feature poets or poetry.
  • Try poetry travel. Whatever your destination, work poetry into your itinerary. Go to readings. Meet local poets. Spend a little time reading the work of poets who lived or worked in the area.
  • Apply for (or take yourself on) a poetry retreat. Set aside a chunk of time — a long weekend, a week, a month — to focus on beginning, expanding, or completing a poetry project.
  • Attend a writers conference.
  • Conduct a poetry salon. Invite poets and non-poets to share an evening of poetry at your home, office, place of worship, or an outdoor venue.
  • Hybridize your poetry. Add something to your poems — photography, film, music, found elements.
  • Plant a poetry garden. Incorporate poems into your garden on signs, stones, or sculpture.
  • Read the poetry book you’ve been avoiding — the one that seems too long, too hard, too old, too out of fashion.
  • Mentor a young poet.
  • Seek out a poet to mentor you!
  • Initiate correspondence with a poet you admire. Be specific about what you value in the poet’s work. Ask a question. Who knows? You may get an answer.
  • And hey, if you happened across this page by accident, please subscribe to The Poetry Department!

Happy New Year!

. . . . .
calendar

resolve

December 31, 2019


 
 
It’s New Year’s Eve. The clear vision of 2020 sits on the horizon. Whether or not you make formal resolutions, it seems worthwhile to begin a new poetry year with intent. So here are a few suggestions:

  • Poetry travel. Whatever your destination, work poetry into your itinerary. Go to readings. Meet local poets. Spend a little time reading the work of poets who lived or worked in the area.
  • Poetry retreat. Set aside a chunk of time — a long weekend, a week, a month — to focus on beginning, expanding, or completing a poetry project.
  • Poetry salon. Invite poets and non-poets to share an evening of poetry at your home, office, place of worship, or an outdoor venue.
  • Poetry hybrids. Add something to your poems — photography, film, music, found elements.
  • Poetry garden. Incorporate poems into your garden on signs, stones, or sculpture.
  • Read the poetry book you’ve been avoiding — the one that seems too long, too hard, too old, too out of fashion.
  • Support poets. Buy books. Attend workshops.
  • Mentor a young poet.
  • Initiate correspondence with a poet you admire. Be specific about what you value in the poet’s work. Ask a question. Who knows? You may get an answer.

Want more poetry resolutions? Here’s our list from December 30, 2015.

Happy New Year!

resolving…

December 30, 2015

2016 calendar
 
 
 
 
 
The year stretches out, just over the horizon. So much potential. What are your resolutions for 2016? Here are a few ideas to start your list:

  • Read more poetry.
  • Along the same lines, take a page from Ann Morgan’s TED talk and expand your vision by reading a book from every country in the world. (More here.)
  • Set aside a specific time to read a poem each day: when you wake up, over breakfast, during your bus commute, before bed.
  • Listen to poetry: find CDs in the library or browse The Poetry Archive, Poetry Out Loud, Penn Sound, and find many more links to poetry audio recordings on the Library of Congress web guide.
  • Write more poetry.
  • Try something entirely different with your poetry: rhyme it (or don’t), write a sonnet or a ghazal or a persona poem or whatever you’re least likely to write normally.
  • Print out one of your poems that’s “finished,” cut it up into individual words and reassemble it into a new poem, getting rid of unnecessary words and replacing those that could be juicier.
  • Ask for feedback.
  • Do something new with your poetry: slam it, submit it, memorize it.
  • Take a poetry workshop or class.
  • When you’re spending money on poetry, support poets, indie bookstores and independent publishers.
  • When you’re moved by a poem, write to the poet to say what you most loved about the poem.
  • Take a resolutions workshop for writers on Sunday, January 3, 2016, at Village Books in Bellingham.
  • Start or join a poetry group: reading, writing, critique, whatever.

Resolved: to have a poetry-rich 2016.
. . . . .
calendar

speaking of resolutions…

January 7, 2013

Appnewser
You were just talking about resolutions, right? Well if the New Year finds you determined to counter the sedentary nature of writing, the folks at Appnewser are watching out for you. Click on over to see their five free fitness and workout apps for the office.

New Year’s resolutions…

January 1, 2013

ResolutionsHappy New Year!

Are you determined to make 2013 a better year for your writing? Village Books is ready to help you kick-start the year with Resolutions for Writers: Help Fulfill Your Writing Goals on Sunday, January 6, 2013, noon to 5pm. A series of five one-hour mini-workshops will cover a variety of writing-related topics certain to support and inspire. No tickets or reservations needed. See the complete workshop descriptions here.
. . . . .
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