on poetry

November 18, 2020

“Richard Hugo taught me that anyone with a desire to write, an ear for language and a bit of imagination could become a writer. He also, in a way, gave me permission to write about northern Montana.”
James Welch
(November 18, 1940 – August 4, 2003)

. . . . .
photo by Lee Nye

The University of Washington has announced that Charles Simic will give the 2018 Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Reading on April 12.

The annual reading honors the acclaimed poet who from 1947 to 1963 was a professor in the UW English Department. Roethke taught a generation of post-war poets, including David Wagoner, Richard Hugo, Tess Gallagher and James Wright.

Simic, a poet and essayist, was born in Yugoslavia in 1938, immigrated to the United States in 1954 and published his first poem at 21 in 1959. Since 1967 he has published 20 books of his own poetry, including “New and Selected Poems (1962-2012)” (2013) and “The Lunatic” (2015). He has also published seven books of essays, a memoir and many volumes of translations of Serbian, Croatian and Slovenian poetry.

He is the recipient of many prizes and awards, most notably the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1990 for his collection “The World Doesn’t End,” and was a finalist for the prize in 1986 and 1987. He has also received the Griffin Prize, a MacArthur Fellowship and the Wallace Stevens Award, all prestigious honors for poets. He served in 2007-2008 as the Poet Laureate of the United States. He is a professor emeritus of English at the University of New Hampshire, where he has taught since 1973.

The reading, which is free, will be at 7:00pm on Thursday, April 12, 2018, at the University of Washington in room 120 of Kane Hall. A reception will follow.

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