dazzling postcards

October 17, 2020

In case you missed this article on the work of Vik Muniz by Tariro Mzezewa in The New York Times, have a look (the bigger the screen the better). It’s a treat for the eyes and an inspiration to postcarders and collage artists.

. . . . .
photo

find it

June 8, 2020

In case you haven’t finished reading the Sunday New York Times, we’re happy to report that found poetry has found its way to Section D, Page 9 of the New York edition with the headline: “Find Poetry In These Pages.” Easy-to-follow instructions, plus the author’s assurance that “Poetry isn’t scary.”

Happily, you can also find Leah Umansky’s article online and learn more about the poet on her website.

. . . . .
image: Poem by Leah Umansky

as the fur flies

December 24, 2019

Perhaps you’ve heard: the movie version of “Cats” is here. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical opened on Broadway in 1982 and is still running, so what could go wrong?

Apparently, more than you’d expect. Rotten Tomatoes, which gives the film 17% on the Tomatometer (as of this writing), says, “Despite its fur-midable cast, this Cats adaptation is a clawful mistake that will leave most viewers begging to be put out of their mew-sery.” Me-ow!

Somewhat hastily released to make scheduled screenings, the film is being reissued with some quick fixes. Here’s Louis Bayard’s commentary in The New York Times.

As the fur flies, it bears repeating that the inspiration for all this drama is a book of rhyming poetry: Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Eliot. If you don’t have a copy on your shelf and the library copy is checked out, you can read it online at Project Gutenberg.

a place to dream and write

November 25, 2019

Perhaps you, too, have imagined your ideal writing space. Poet John Barr had the imagination, the time, and the resources to create the writing studio of his dreams near his home in Greenwich, Connecticut. The story appeared last week in The New York Times, reprinted in The Seattle Times.

finding poetry

June 28, 2019

The New York Times

In case you missed the announcement a couple of weeks ago, The New York Times posted the winners of its annual student poetry contest. This year, the Times challenged students to create blackout poems from pages of the paper’s print edition. They chose 25 winners (from more than 2500 submissions). The poems are creative, beautiful, and poetic. Have a look. And if you think it’s easy, do as the article suggests and try it yourself!

round three

December 18, 2018

And yet more year’s-best-poetry lists:

three percent

November 24, 2018

The New York Times has released its list of 100 Notable Books of 2018. Three volumes of poetry are included:

  • Brown: Poems by Kevin Young
  • The Odyssey by Homer
  • Wade in the Water: Poems by Tracy K. Smith

Catch up with the complete list here.

edits and revisions

August 4, 2017

We recently ran two guest posts on the subject of revision, the first by Bethany Reid, the second by Richard Widerkehr. It’s a fascinating topic, and a process we don’t often get to observe in the work of the poets we admire.

In an article in this week’s Book Review section, The New York Times opens a window onto the process of writing and revising, with brief statements by six poets and images of their works in process.

. . . . .
Joanne Carson manuscript with edits by Truman Capote

found poem by j.i. kleinbergAttention students! The New York Times has opened its 8th annual Found Poem Student Contest for youth ages 13 to 19. Using no more than two articles from the entire New York Times archive as source material, “find” words for a poem of 14 lines or fewer. The deadline is 7:00am Eastern time on Tuesday, May 9, 2017, and the complete guidelines (and lots of suggestions) are on this page: The Learning Network | Our Eighth Annual Found Poem Student Contest.

The New York Times

The New York Times Opinion page writer Nicholas Kristof invites you to submit a poem for his Donald Trump Poetry Contest. There’s no specific deadline, but the contest probably won’t last long, so act soon. Visit the announcement and post your poem as a comment.

%d bloggers like this: