Spend an evening at the lovely Lincoln Theatre in Mount Vernon as Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest offers a reading followed by a generative poetry workshop. The event, on Saturday, September 3, 2022, at 7:30pm, is entirely FREE, thanks to Humanities Washington, the Washington State Arts Commission, Skagit River Poetry Foundation, Skagit Land Trust, and Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group.

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photo by Calvin Miller (@cmjphotojournal)

call for salmon poems!

August 4, 2022

With the support of a fellowship from the Academy of American Poets, Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest is creating an anthology of poetry dedicated to salmon, and is calling for submissions from Washington State writers.

“Salmon are the unsung heroes of our region,” she says. “Adventurous and brave, they swim from their natal rivers out into the perils of the open ocean. Persistent, resilient, and strong, they swim upstream against swift currents for hundreds of miles to return home to spawn and complete the cycle of life.

“Salmon are sacred to my tribe, the Lhaq’temish (Lummi) Nation. We celebrate them in ceremony and song, and they have long been central to our Sche’le’ngen, our way of life. By celebrating salmon through poetry in every corner of the state, I hope to raise goodwill and a feeling of reverence for the salmon, a feeling that my people have felt since time immemorial.

“Seattle-based writer Timothy Egan writes, ‘The Pacific Northwest is simply this: wherever the salmon can get to.’ Before dams were installed, salmon inhabited streams throughout Washington state, even as far inland as Spokane, the Tri-Cities, and beyond. They have been a huge part of our regional identity, and I hope you will submit a poem or two about our iconic wild salmon.”

This project is supported in part by Humanities WA, the Washington State Arts Commission, and the Academy of American Poets. Empty Bowl Press will publish the anthology in 2023.

The submission deadline is September 18, 2022. See the complete guidelines here.

reserve your seat!

June 3, 2022

If you think that Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest just sits around waiting for the muse, think again! In addition to fulfilling her geographically challenging laureate duties, writing articles and poems, leading classes and workshops, and pursuing numerous community projects, Rena has found time to work with illustrator Jake Stoumbos on a new book: Northwest Know-how: Beaches.

Described as being “Entertaining, educational and highly giftable,” the book features descriptions of more than 30 beaches in Washington and Oregon, providing tips for visiting, fun facts, natural history, poetry, and lore.

Village Books and the North Cascades Institute invite you to join Rena and Jake for their book launch, presented as part of the Nature of Writing series on Friday, June 10, 2022, at 7:00pm, in the Readings Gallery at Village Books in Bellingham.

PLEASE NOTE: Village Books is still operating at limited capacity for in-person events. Proof of full vaccination is required, masking is optional, and advance registration is strongly recommended.

salmon poetry

April 30, 2022

This is a guest post by Rena Priest.

Greetings Poets! Happy National Poetry Month!

As the month winds down and I head into my second year as Washington State Poet Laureate, I’m delighted to have this opportunity to share a few words with you. It has been a fantastic year full of new faces and reconnecting with old friends in the poetry community. I’ve shared poetry with many organizations, libraries, schools, and institutions, and I’ve written several new poems for special occasions. I have even collected a new manuscript!

Now I want to read your poems, specifically your salmon poems. Over the summer and early fall, I will be offering a traveling workshop called How to Catch a Salmon Poem. In this workshop, we’ll respond to a series of prompts to cultivate poems for a salmon-themed anthology. By the end of our time together, attendees will have a fresh catch of ideas to help them reel in new poems.

Why salmon? Salmon are the unsung heroes of our region. Adventurous and brave, they swim from their natal rivers out into the perils of the open ocean, where their bodies soak up the rich nutrients of the sea. Persistent, resilient, and strong, they swim upstream against swift currents for hundreds of miles to return home to spawn and complete the cycle of life. A keystone species, after spawning, they die and transfer all the marine-derived nutrients carried in their bodies to the animals, insects, soil, and plants in and around their natal stream.

Salmon are sacred to my tribe, the Lhaq’temish (Lummi) Nation. We celebrate them in ceremony and song, and they have long been central to our Sche’le’ngen, our way of life. By celebrating salmon through poetry in every corner of the state, I hope to raise goodwill and a feeling of reverence for the salmon, a feeling that my people have felt since time immemorial.

Seattle-based writer Timothy Egan writes, “The Pacific Northwest is simply this: wherever the salmon can get to.” Before dams were installed, salmon inhabited streams throughout Washington state, even as far inland as Spokane, the Tri-Cities, and beyond. They have been a massive part of our regional identity, and with many species struggling, it’s time to love them enough to save them.

Saving salmon and acknowledging our shared humanity through poetry is at the heart of my motivation to create an anthology celebrating our state’s salmon runs as well as our poets. I hope you will join us in one of these generative workshop offerings and be inspired to submit a poem or two about our iconic wild salmon of Washington state. I will be sharing workshop dates as they are set.

In the meantime, if you happen to have salmon poems in your repertoire, you can submit 1-3 poems via email to poet [AT] humanities.org. The open call deadline is June 1, 2022.

In your email, please affirm that

  • you currently live in Washington State
  • your poems are previously unpublished, or
  • your poems are published, but you retain the right to republish

If your poem is previously published

  • give the places and dates of all previous publications
  • affirm that you retain all rights to the work, and
  • include links to websites where available

If you’d like to have me offer a workshop in your community, you can send a message through my website (www.renapriest.com) and we can talk about scheduling a date. Stay tuned for more info! I look forward to reading your poems!!

Yours,
Rena Priest
Washington State Poet Laureate (2021-2023)

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Rena Priest is a poet and an enrolled member of the Lhaq’temish (Lummi) Nation. She has been appointed to serve as the Washington State Poet Laureate from April 2021 to 2023. She is the 2022 Maxine Cushing Gray Distinguished Writing Fellow, an Indigenous Nations Poets Fellow, a Jack Straw Writer (2019), and a Vadon Foundation Fellow. She is also the recipient of an Allied Arts Foundation Professional Poets Award. Her debut collection, Patriarchy Blues, received an American Book Award, and her second collection, Sublime Subliminal, was published as the finalist for the Floating Bridge Press Chapbook Award. Priest holds an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College.

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author photo by Savanna Estey
salmon photo from Salmon Need Water

Hike and Write with Rena

March 27, 2022

You are invited to join Washington Poet Laureate Rena Priest on Sunday, April 10, 2022, for a two-part event in Snoqualmie Valley, including a Hike and Write followed by a poetry reading.

The event begins with Rena Priest leading a meditative hike along Snoqualmie Valley’s beautiful “Palouse to Cascades Trail” in Iron Horse State Park, North Bend, WA (adjacent to Rattlesnake Lake). Rena will offer a guided writing workshop during the hike. No prior hiking or writing experience is necessary, but participants will need a Discover Pass for parking; weather appropriate clothes and shoes; journal or writing pad and pen or pencil; water and a snack.

After the hike, join Rena for a poetry reading at The Black Dog Arts Cafe in Snoqualmie and enjoy handcrafted food and beverages. Books will be available for purchase and signing.

The hike will begin at Noon and end before 3:00pm, allowing time (about 20 minutes) for the group to reach Black Dog for the 3:00pm reading.

Both events are free and for all ages, no advance registration required; feel free to attend one or both. Find complete details on Facebook.

On Saturday, January 29, 2022, 10:00am – Noon Pacific, Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest will offer an online (Zoom) workshop: Pulling Poems from the Ends of Our Pens.

Here’s Rena’s description of the workshop:

“Where do your poems come from?” This question is often asked in Q & A sessions and interviews. I think it’s a great question. Where do poems come from? We’ll have a discussion about where our poems come from and if you have a favorite poem you’ve written, I invite you to bring it along and share it, along with a few words about your process. People will also often ask “How do you start a poem?” In this workshop we’ll begin by sharing our strategies for getting started, and we’ll respond to a series of prompts. By the end of our time together you’ll have a fresh set of ideas on which to build new poems.

Rena Priest is a Poet and an enrolled member of the Lhaq’temish (Lummi) Nation. She has been appointed to serve as the Washington State Poet Laureate for the term of April 2021-2023. She is a Vadon Foundation Fellow, and recipient of an Allied Arts Foundation Professional Poets Award. Her debut collection, Patriarchy Blues, was published in 2017 by MoonPath Press and received an American Book Award. She is a National Geographic Explorer (2018-2020) and a Jack Straw Writer (2019). She holds an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College.

Registration is required and all fees benefit the Sue C. Boynton Poetry Contest: $30 per workshop. Zoom links will be provided after registration.

TO REGISTER, please submit your payment of $30 via Venmo (www.venmo.com/SueC-BoyntonContest ) OR by check (made out to Sue C. Boynton Contest) mailed to PO Box 5442, Bellingham, WA 98227-5442. Please be sure to include your name, email, phone, and the title/date of the workshop(s) you wish to attend. If you have questions, please contact Jay, our workshop coordinator by email: jsnahani AT gmail.com.

See the full lineup of winter 2022 workshops on the Workshops page.

Artists help us to see

November 6, 2021

Dear Friends,   

In the last year and a half, I have really put in the hustle to establish myself as a reliable freelance writer, a warm and insightful guest speaker, an arts lecturer, and a friendly roving poet. I like to think that I have taken care of my community and myself by creating new poems that are infused with light, hope, beauty, and love, and by doing work that has given my tribal community something to celebrate. 

I took the leap and left my secure, tribal government position, knowing that Artist Trust’s Vadon Foundation Fellowship for Native Artists allowed me to take a calculated risk as I accepted an appointment as Washington State Poet Laureate. In this way, Artist Trust’s funding has been hugely beneficial to me, to the Indigenous community, and to the Washington poetry community by making it possible for a candidate that would otherwise be excluded due to economic limitations, to be eligible to take on this very demanding and highly visible role.   

I am ever motivated to share my love of poetry and art; to give to others what so many poets and artists have so generously given to me — a way of seeing the world that helped me see beyond my own experiences — a springboard for my own imagination.

I believe now, more than ever, artists need financial support. We are in a time where it’s going to be crucial to imagine a new world and a new way forward. Your gift to Artist Trust will directly support the artists who are catalysts for this imagining. Creation is our business. We are cultural change agents. Storytellers and artists help us to see the world as it is and as it could be. They offer us new perspectives and entice human culture toward evolution.

The world is made brick by brick of stories, images, and models that take shape in the world first by inspiring a new way of seeing, which evolves into a set of beliefs, then actions, then reality. Who will envision this new reality if our visionaries cannot do their work because they’re forced to choose between making rich men richer with their labor or making the world beautiful through their art?   

Hoykweche,   

Rena Priest

a visit from Rick Steves

October 20, 2021

Rick Steves may be “America’s most respected authority on European travel,” but Washington state is his home base and poetry is on his agenda. With that in mind, Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism invited Rick Steves to sample the local fare, which he did, in three episodes. In the third and final segment, his cultural tour concludes with a poem read by Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest. We don’t get to see Rena, but we get a coastal flyover and we hear her voice as she reads her pantoum, “Focus and Circuli: Songs on the Salmon Scale” beginning at about 04:30 on the video timer.

Window on Rena Priest

August 2, 2021

There’s a nice article by Frances Badgett on Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest in the new issue of Window, the magazine of Western Washington University. Have a look at “Ending the Plague with Poetry.”

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thanks to Nancy Pagh for the lead

The SpeakEasy poetry series is honored to feature Rena Priest, the new Washington State Poet Laureate, at SpeakEasy 28: Homecoming. Presented on Zoom on Saturday, April 24, 2021, at 7:00pm Pacific, the reading will also include Rena’s poet/mentors James Bertolino, Anita K. Boyle, Nancy Pagh, and Jeanne Yeasting. For a Zoom link, please send an email to othermindpress AT gmail.com.

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