working poets

April 21, 2016

poets at work

Get the dog and the cat and take a National Poetry Month break, courtesy of Michael Dylan Welch.

Recognizing the similarities between poets and pets, he has created a page of altered quotes, Let Sleeping Poets Lie, in which the words pet(s), dog(s) and cat(s), as well as puppies and kittens, are replaced with poet(s).

When you’re ready for more, visit Look What the Poet Dragged In, where he’s given similar treatment to idiomatic expressions.

Watch out, Michael Dylan Welch, the poetcatcher is after you.
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just one word

September 12, 2014

only

This little wordplay, which is borrowed from the word-savvy folks at Grammarly (who borrowed and reworked it from curlicuecal), is not only fun but instructive. While not every word has the sense-altering impact of only, the exercise of moving the word through the sentence illustrates the significance of placement and how meaning can be changed by repositioning a single word. Try it with your own writing, not necessarily with the word only, but by shifting just one word through your lines of text to see what happens…