on poetry

June 15, 2017


words
are a waste of time…
poppies

Kobayashi Issa
(June 15, 1763 – January 5, 1828)

. . . . .
image
text

Advertisements

Logophilia*

August 14, 2016

Logophilia - Dayna Patterson
2016 Merit Award
By Dayna Patterson

I want a dictionary with all the words.
I want a dictionary so big it houses all
the words and parts of words,
phonemes, morphemes, roots and
leaves, their histories. Words in every
language, from Persian to Portuguese.
I want the internet of words, their flux
and flummox and flume. I want the
words to unfold, unfurl, unravel,
uncrease, release. Whisper sub rosa
their viscera, their mystery. I want the
OED, the Merriam-Webster,
American Heritage, Collegiate,
Urban, Slang. I want the Big Bang of
all those words and what they mean
Inside my brain, deep in my cortical
cells, the oldest part. I want the art of
words, want them to multiply like
plankton, so numerous they feed
whale bodies of poems, allow them to
surface, sing, allow me not to repeat
myself when I tell you I love you
dooset daram       eu te amo       I love

. . . . .
*Copyright 2016 by Dayna Patterson. Broadside illustrated by Megan Carroll.

the words we use

June 1, 2016

Langston Hughes wordcloud

We all have quirks of syntax and vocabulary that distinguish our writing. We have words that recur in our poetry, suggesting themes or simply the linguistic equivalent of comfortable slippers. Joanne Jeffries and Julian Yanover analyzed their database of more than 35,000 poems, looking for the words most used by individual poets and by classic and contemporary poets. From the results, they offer a series of word clouds with mouse-over sliding images for nine poets and for classic vs. contemporary. They’ve posted “Poetic WordClouds: These are the most common words in Poetry” on My Poetic Side, which has no “About” page but seems to be an online poetry community. Enjoy!
. . . . .
Langston Hughes wordcloud
Thanks to Susan Chase-Foster for the heads up!

on poetry

October 30, 2015

Paul Valéry“Of two possible words always choose the lesser.”
Paul Valéry
(October 30, 1871 – July 20, 1945)
. . . . .
photo by Pierre Choumoff

worth revisiting

September 3, 2015

Annie Vought - Struck By and Carried Away

We mentioned the stunning work of artist Annie Vought back in 2012. A magnificent obsession, her work of cutting large tracts of words (as well as abstract designs) from sheets of (usually black) paper investigates “the visual architecture of language and the limits of paper.” Learn (and see) more: Annie Vought’s website, then get back to your writing.
. . . . .
image: Struck By and Carried Away

ornament the season

December 22, 2014

ornament © j.i. kleinberg 2014

Have a word-ful season!
ornament © j.i. kleinberg 2014

just one word

September 12, 2014

only

This little wordplay, which is borrowed from the word-savvy folks at Grammarly (who borrowed and reworked it from curlicuecal), is not only fun but instructive. While not every word has the sense-altering impact of only, the exercise of moving the word through the sentence illustrates the significance of placement and how meaning can be changed by repositioning a single word. Try it with your own writing, not necessarily with the word only, but by shifting just one word through your lines of text to see what happens…

%d bloggers like this: