Planning WAY ahead…

March 22, 2018

Mark your calendar for March 27–30, 2019, when the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) Conference & Bookfair will be held in Portland, Oregon. The AWP Portland Subcommittee has just issued a call for proposals, which opens today, March 22, and closes May 1, 2018. (Guidelines here.)

The AWP Conference was last in Cascadia in 2014, when some 12,000 attendees thronged the Seattle Convention Center. Prior to that, AWP was held regionally in Vancouver, BC, in 2005, and was last held in Portland in 1998. Early-bird registration typically begins in late July. AWP membership is not required for attendance.


think global, poem local

March 21, 2018

World Poetry Day

Today, Wednesday, March 21, 2018, is World Poetry Day. Among the many ways to celebrate, consider joining friends, neighbors, musicians, and poets at Greene’s Corner in Bellingham, Washington. The every-Wednesday gathering of music and poetry will this evening feature poets Jim Bertolino and Anita K. Boyle. A Musician’s Open Mic begins at 7:00pm with the music of JP Falcon Grady, poetry to follow.

Engaging, amusing, and exceedingly well-organized, the Inland Poetry Prowl has quickly become one of the region’s poetry treasures. With a full day of 45-minute readings and panel discussions in venues up and down Pearl Street in downtown Ellensburg, Washington, this is an action-packed, not-to-be-missed getaway. (There’s also plenty of open mic opportunity.)

This year’s Prowl, on Saturday, April 7, 2018, (with a few bonus activities on Friday evening and Sunday morning), has an impressive lineup of readers and panelists and a schedule that will leave you panting.

What’s more, the Poetry Prowl is FREE. Yup. No charge. (Money for food, beverages, and books aside.) Ellensburg is under two hours from Seattle and April in Central Washington is typically mild and lovely. Don’t miss it.

Tucked away in the Comox Valley of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Cumberland calls itself “a bustling village.” Home to some 3,700 souls, it’s an area known for hiking, biking, and refreshing dips in glacier-fed Comox Lake. If an end-of-summer visit sounds tempting, consider enrolling in the Deep in Cascadia Poetics Retreat, September 6-9, 2018.

A no-frills gathering of up to 30 participants, Deep in Cascadia will focus on “our role as poets and bioregionalists at this time of ecological crisis and end-stage empire, and to support one another in our efforts to create the deepest gestures in response to this situation and how that relates to Cascadia.”

See the complete description and schedule, visit the Cascadia Poetics LAB.

on poetry

March 18, 2018

“All a poet can do today is warn.”
Wilfred Owen
(March 18, 1893 – November 4, 1918)

. . . . .
quote from the Preface to Poems of Wilfred Owen


March 17, 2018

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we remind you that submissions for Issue 15 of Clover, A Literary Rag are open until April 30, 2018.

We like to make note of places where poetry finds an unexpected audience and here’s one from Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Platform 2018 is a contemporary arts festival in its second year, which offers a week of exhibitions, performances, music, talks, and workshops, March 24-31, 2018. Into that substantial mix comes Perth poet Jim Mackintosh, PLATFORM Poet in Residence, who will visit

all the Festival events to tease out collaborations and create new work to be published during the Festival via a daily diary blog / Twitter / Instagram with the odd photograph and video along the way.

He will also be travelling the bus routes of Perth and Perthshire to engage with passengers, bus staff and anyone impacted by the bus routes to pen some new poems but importantly to encourage people to pen their own poems based on their travels and using text, e-mail, scraps of paper persuade them to submit their words so they can be pulled together and displayed or even published later in the year.

Mr. Mackintosh was previously named Club Poet for the St. Johnstone Saints, a professional Scottish football club. For a taste of what bus riders might hear, watch Mackintosh read his poem “Mind The Time” on YouTube.

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