Engaging, amusing, and exceedingly well-organized, the Inland Poetry Prowl has quickly become one of the region’s poetry treasures. With a full day of 45-minute readings and panel discussions in venues up and down Pearl Street in downtown Ellensburg, Washington, this is an action-packed, not-to-be-missed getaway. (There’s also plenty of open mic opportunity.)

This year’s Prowl, on Saturday, April 7, 2018, (with a few bonus activities on Friday evening and Sunday morning), has an impressive lineup of readers and panelists and a schedule that will leave you panting.

What’s more, the Poetry Prowl is FREE. Yup. No charge. (Money for food, beverages, and books aside.) Ellensburg is under two hours from Seattle and April in Central Washington is typically mild and lovely. Don’t miss it.


Tucked away in the Comox Valley of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Cumberland calls itself “a bustling village.” Home to some 3,700 souls, it’s an area known for hiking, biking, and refreshing dips in glacier-fed Comox Lake. If an end-of-summer visit sounds tempting, consider enrolling in the Deep in Cascadia Poetics Retreat, September 6-9, 2018.

A no-frills gathering of up to 30 participants, Deep in Cascadia will focus on “our role as poets and bioregionalists at this time of ecological crisis and end-stage empire, and to support one another in our efforts to create the deepest gestures in response to this situation and how that relates to Cascadia.”

See the complete description and schedule, visit the Cascadia Poetics LAB.

on poetry

March 18, 2018

“All a poet can do today is warn.”
Wilfred Owen
(March 18, 1893 – November 4, 1918)

. . . . .
quote from the Preface to Poems of Wilfred Owen


March 17, 2018

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we remind you that submissions for Issue 15 of Clover, A Literary Rag are open until April 30, 2018.

We like to make note of places where poetry finds an unexpected audience and here’s one from Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Platform 2018 is a contemporary arts festival in its second year, which offers a week of exhibitions, performances, music, talks, and workshops, March 24-31, 2018. Into that substantial mix comes Perth poet Jim Mackintosh, PLATFORM Poet in Residence, who will visit

all the Festival events to tease out collaborations and create new work to be published during the Festival via a daily diary blog / Twitter / Instagram with the odd photograph and video along the way.

He will also be travelling the bus routes of Perth and Perthshire to engage with passengers, bus staff and anyone impacted by the bus routes to pen some new poems but importantly to encourage people to pen their own poems based on their travels and using text, e-mail, scraps of paper persuade them to submit their words so they can be pulled together and displayed or even published later in the year.

Mr. Mackintosh was previously named Club Poet for the St. Johnstone Saints, a professional Scottish football club. For a taste of what bus riders might hear, watch Mackintosh read his poem “Mind The Time” on YouTube.

Congratulations to Cedar Tree School junior Isaac Lu, who has been named 2018 Poetry Out Loud State Champion. Lu earned the honor of representing Washington State at the Poetry Out Loud National Finals, to be held April 23-25, 2018, at the Lisner Auditorium at The George Washington University. Watch him recite “A Thank-You Note” by Michael Ryan on YouTube.

Rising to the top from a competitive field of over 18,000 students from 66 schools across the state, Lu was among the 13 regional Poetry Out Loud champions who competed at the State Final held March 10, 2018, in Tacoma.

Although he had competed in Poetry Out Loud before, this was the first time Lu made it through regional to the state competition. He credits his success to his choice of poems and the work he did to try to understand what the poems meant.

Janelle Thirtyacre, a senior at Eatonville High School in Pierce County, was named first runner-up. Honorable mentions went to Addi Garner, a senior at Anacortes High School in Skagit County (and last year’s state champ); John Jones, a senior at Rainier High School in Thurston County; and Mackenzie Woodworth, a senior at Liberty Bell High School in Okanogan County.

As the Washington State Champion, Isaac Lu will receive an award of $200 and an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., to compete at the national championship. Cedar Tree School will receive a $500 stipend for the purchase of poetry materials. First runner-up Janelle Thirtyacre will receive $100, with a $200 stipend going to Eatonville High School’s library.

nurturing the story

March 14, 2018

If you are looking to create, refine, or publish short stories, consider this intriguing program from Kahini.

Eleven Stories is a year-long program exploring the genre from a variety of perspectives. Comprised of weekly text lectures and videos focused on 24 craft elements, the goal is to write one new short story each month. There are two tracks: Writing and Publishing, with lectures by Sheila Bender, Gary Copeland Lilley, Jordan Hartt, Sayantani Dasgupta, and others. Eleven Stories started in January, but if you’re interested, visit the Eleven Stories page or contact writing@kahini.org.

%d bloggers like this: